An Afternoon with the Paramedics

Jun 15

An Afternoon with the Paramedics

On Sunday, June 14, we were able to visit the Ottawa Paramedic Service Headquarters. The visit was arranged by the Ottawa Anaphylaxis Support Group, and it was an excellent opportunity for the group, which was made up mainly of anaphylactic children and their parents, to learn about what paramedics do, how the paramedic centre is run, and how paramedics respond to an anaphylactic reaction. The educational presentations and question-and-answer session were fascinating and informative, and the children were thrilled to be able to explore several different ambulances and areas of this state-of-the-art facility. The Ottawa Paramedic Service Headquarters is one of the best paramedic systems in North America; and, in Canada, it is second only to the paramedic headquarters in Toronto. It has 360 paramedics on staff and takes 103,000 9-1-1 calls per year. Presenter Darryl Wilton, President of the Professional Paramedic Association of Ottawa, shared some 9-1-1 tips to keep in mind in case you need to call for an ambulance for treatment of an anaphylactic reaction (note that most of these points are universal, but some may not apply in other cities): Always administer epinephrine first – before calling 9-1-1. Darryl said that he has seen first-hand how administering epinephrine at the earliest possible opportunity results in the most favorable outcomes. He also pointed out that epinephrine is a relatively safe medication and, therefore, there should be no hesitation in giving it if you have any reason to think that an allergic reaction may be occurring. Identify the emergency as anaphylaxis. After you’ve called 9-1-1 and have been transferred to a paramedic, state that the emergency is an anaphylactic reaction. This will give your call the highest priority – Code 4, which is for a life-threatening emergency. The next-most important information you can give is your address, although GPS coordinates will work as well. Don’t second-guess the paramedics. Once the ambulance has arrived, don’t challenge the treatment the paramedics are administering. They work from complex and effective algorithms that have been proven to save lives. Give the patient’s family doctor and allergist’s names to the emergency department physician. This will ensure that copies of your emergency department records are included in your medical files. Finally, Darryl cautioned that...

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The Nut-Free Mom Blog: The Nut-Free Lowdown on Hersheys Chocolates

Jun 15

We all love Hersheys Chocolates but throwing nut allergies into the mix makes it hard to love. Jenny at Nut Free Mom found someone that has provided a good list of safe candies for us to enjoy! I get a lot of questions about the safety of various candies so I thought I would share this updated Hershey candy info with you. One of the members from my local food allergy support group spent a long time on the phone with a Hersheys rep and e-mailed everyone a list of safe candies. via The Nut-Free Mom Blog: The Nut-Free Lowdown on Hersheys Chocolates. Share...

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Peanuts, Anyone? Researchers Expose Kids to Risky Foods in Order to Cure Them – washingtonpost.com

Jun 09

Oral immunotherapy is still in the research stage, but any news is good news. Knowing that this possible treatment is on the way with funding to keep it alive makes us all very happy. Ever since she was an infant, Reagan Roberts could not tolerate being anywhere near cow’s milk. A mere sip would leave her vomiting and gasping for breath. If she were even touched by someone with milk on their hands, she would break out in hives and a bright red rash. via Peanuts, Anyone? Researchers Expose Kids to Risky Foods in Order to Cure Them – washingtonpost.com. Share...

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Kellogg and Kashi bars to contain almond and peanut

Jun 06

Notice form Anaphylaxis Canada: Kellogg Canada Inc. and Kashi Canada Inc. have recently made changes to the production of three of their products: Kashi Chewy Granola Bars Cherry Dark Chocolate and Kellogg All-Bran Chewy Bar Dark Chocolate Chip and Kellogg All-Bran Chewy Bar Strawberry Flavour. These products have been re-formulated and have new ingredient labels, which now include new allergens that were not previously found in their products. Please read the notice below for the specific changes to each product. If you have any questions/concerns, please contact Kashi Canada or Kellogg Canada directly through their customer relations departments at the numbers listed below. For your information, Anaphylaxis Canada ************************************ Formulation Change to Kashi Chewy Granola Bars Cherry Dark Chocolate Kashi Canada has reformulated Kashi Chewy Granola Bars Cherry Dark Chocolate. Starting in June 2009 Kashi Chewy Granola Bars Cherry Dark Chocolate will contain almond and peanut ingredients. The ingredient statement will include this change and will also list almond and peanut ingredients as well as May contain other tree nuts in the allergen contains statement. All Kashi brand packages are labeled with the nine ingredients recognized by Health Canada as the most frequent cause of allergic reactions. These priority allergens when present will be listed in our ingredient listing directly below our Nutrition Facts panel. We encourage you to ALWAYS check the ingredient listing on EACH package you purchase for the most up-to-date information on the ingredients contained in that particular package. Consumers with questions regarding this product announcement can contact Kashi Canada Inc. at 1-866-958-7884 Monday through Friday 8:30am  4:30pm ET. ******************************** Formulation Change to Kellogg All-Bran Chewy Bar Dark Chocolate Chip and Kellogg All-Bran Chewy Bar Strawberry Flavour Kellogg Canada has reformulated Kellogg* All-Bran Chewy Bar Dark Chocolate Chip and Kellogg All-Bran Chewy Bar Strawberry Flavour. Starting in June 2009 these Kellogg bars will contain almond and peanut ingredients. The ingredient statement will include this change and will also list almond and peanut ingredients as well as May contain other tree nuts in the allergen contains statement. All Kellogg brand packages are labeled with the nine ingredients recognized by Health Canada as the most frequent cause of allergic reactions. These priority allergens when present will be listed...

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HealthGuru.com: Ancient Chinese Secret for Peanut Allergy

Jun 05

The herbal remedy from China isn’t new news but it is new that the FDA has been given drug approval! Read on for more promising news. An investigational drug, FAHF-2, has been given new drug approval by the FDA. The herbal remedy shows great promise in reversing anaphylaxis, a severe and life-threatening reaction to peanuts that can result in death. In clinical trials in mice, the herbal remedy has been shown to prevent anaphylaxis for more than 9 months after the treatment was stopped. Food allergies have been on the rise for several years. Peanut allergy doubled in children between the years 1997 and 2002. It is estimated that 150 people die every year in the US as a result of food allergies. Even trace amounts of these foods can cause a life-threatening reaction. There is no cure for food allergies. People who suffer food allergies must practice strict avoidance of known triggers and seek help immediately if food is accidentally ingested. Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction that can occur extremely rapidly and can result in death if not treated immediately. People who have asthma in addition to food allergies may be at higher risk of suffering a severe reaction. The following symptoms may occur in an anaphylactic reaction: Itching, tingling or metal-like taste in the mouth Hives Wheezing or difficulty breathing Swelling of the mouth and throat Low blood pressure Loss of consciousness The herbal remedy for peanut allergy, as well as a remedy for asthma, is currently being tested on humans. via News.HealthGuru.com: Ancient Chinese Secret for Peanut Allergy. Related: FAHF-2 provides peanut-allergic mice long-term protection from anaphylactic reactions Share...

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