Win an autographed copy of one of Kyle Dine’s CDs!

Feb 14

Win an autographed copy of one of Kyle Dine’s CDs!

Now that you all know about Kyle Dine you will be happy to hear that I have a copy of each of Kyle Dine’s albums Food Allergies Rock, his newest release and You Must Be Nuts BOTH AUTOGRAPHED AND AVAILABLE TO BE WON!!! To win one (it will be a random draw for each) all you have to do is comment here with a piece of info about Kyle that you find on his website or on his Facebook page! While you’re on his Facebook page make sure you Like it!!! With hits like Food Allergies Rock, My Epineph-Friend, Epiman, The Doghouse and The Birthday Party, these albums should be in everyone’s collection! If you don’t win be sure to order one or both! The contest will run until the end of the day on March 1st so be sure to post! One post per person please. Multiple comments will only be counted once. I will do a random draw on or around the 2nd of March and contact the winners around the same time. Good luck and spread the news of the contest!!! Share...

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Kyle Dine Rocks!

Dec 22

Kyle Dine Rocks!

Last month, we had the great pleasure of seeing Kyle Dine in concert! Kyle Dine is a musician who records and performs children’s music about food allergies. His songs contain positive messages on living with and safely managing one’s food allergies, and his concerts are educational, uplifting, and a lot of fun. We had the opportunity to ask a few questions of this gifted songwriter. How old were you when you found out you had a food allergy and how did it happen? I first found out that I had food allergies when I was two years old. My parents tell me that I experienced a rash and hives all over my body after consuming a milkshake which had egg in the ice cream. What are you allergic to? I am currently allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, fish, shellfish, mustard, penicillin, and dogs and cats. When did you start advocating for food allergic people? I started advocating for people with allergies when I was in university. I did a few backpacking trips across Europe, and realized how difficult it was to travel safely when dealing with foreign languages. I created http://www.facebook.com/l/a501bF-7bLSBIWwKLP3ny-k5_Pw;www.allergytranslation.com as a tool to help communicate dietary needs on a credit card sized translation card. When did you decide that music was how you wanted to send the message? I have always been passionate about music, but the idea to do songs about food allergies came to me when I was teaching guitar at a peanut-free summer camp. Music is such an effective way to convey a message, as well as instilling elements of fun and engagement to listeners. Your songs definitely relay a positive message; in fact, they even seem celebratory. How important do you think it is for kids to feel as if they can “celebrate” their allergies? There is a constant theme of optimism in all my songs. This is really important to me because I want kids to focus on the positive, and become empowered over their allergies. The likelihood of risk-taking is lower when children are confident about what they need to do to stay safe. Managing one’s own serious food allergies is a big thing for a child to take responsibility of....

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WestJet Steps Up to the Mike | Allergic Living

Dec 09

WestJet Steps Up to the Mike | Allergic Living

By: Gwen Smith, Allergic Living Editor Hallelujah, we’ve been heard. If you ask a flight attendant on WestJet, Canada’s second largest airline, she or he will step to the microphone and ask fellow passengers to please not pull out nut or peanut snacks. The attendant will briefly explain that this is because there is a person onboard with serious allergies. via WestJet Steps Up to the Mike | Allergic Living. Of course this is HUGE news for the food allergic traveller our there. WestJet knows how to deal with the public, unlike Air Canada that gives you a buffer zone, IF you have filled in the required  form from your doctor and faxed to the medical desk and a call to Reservations to book the zone. At least they have something. Share...

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Avoiding Milk Blog: Allergy Gear for Christmas

Dec 08

AVOIDING MILK BLOG AVOIDING MILK PROTEIN AND OTHER ALLERGY FREE FOOD FINDS. Karen over at Avoiding Milk Protein has a great list of gear for allergy awareness and gifts over the holiday List of allergy gear companies in time for Christmas, from allergy t-shirts to magnets. Many of these companies also offer gift certificates. Avoiding Milk Blog: Allergy Gear for Christmas. Share...

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Allergic Living – Quaker facility closed. Boy goes home :)

Dec 01

Allergic Living – Quaker facility closed. Boy goes home :)

Allergic Living has reported that after the packaging error that occurred last week at the Quaker Canada facility the facility has been closed pending an internal investigation and that the boy that was affected by an allergic reaction has gone home. We’re happy for the good news about the boy and hope that Quaker gets to the bottom of this soon! Read the article here… From the Quaker website IMPORTANT PRODUCT NOTICE The health and safety of our consumers is our highest priority. Accordingly, Quaker Canada has initiated a voluntary recall of our 14 count Quaker Chewy Granola Bars Value Pack cartons that may have been mis-labeled. No other packages of Quaker bars or Quaker products are affected. Quaker Canada is taking this action out of an abundance of caution because the outside packaging erroneously states that the boxes should contain Chewy Chocolate Chip and Chewy S’mores bars, both of which are made in a peanut-free facility. The individually-wrapped bars are clearly and accurately labeled. Consumers who have purchased a 14 count Quaker Chewy Granola Bars Value Pack carton with a UPC Bar Code ending in 10742 should inspect the contents of the carton to ensure it contains the correct product (Chewy Chocolate Chip and Chewy S’mores bars). If the carton contains Dipps Chocolate Chip and Dipps Caramel Nut bars and a consumer has a peanut or tree nut allergy, they should return it to the retailer where it was purchased for a refund. No other packages of Quaker bars or Quaker products are affected. There is NO health risk associated with handling the mis-labeled product for disposal, however this product should not be consumed by those in a peanut or tree nut-allergic household. The company is working closely with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Anaphylaxis Canada to notify the public. Consumers with questions may contact us by calling the toll-free hotline at 1-800-267-6287. Share...

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Allergy Eats interviews Julia Bradsher, CEO of FAAN

Nov 30

Paul Antico at Allergyeats.com has a great interview posted on his site where he had the chance to get some questions answered by Julia Bradsher surrounding her views of the restaurant industry in the US, among other things. It’s a great and insightful read and I recommend you pop over and see what she had to say! I recently had the opportunity to interview Julia Bradsher, Chief Executive Officer of the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), to discuss a wide range of issues related to dining out with food allergies.  I always find Julia very engaging with insightful comments and an incredible knowledge base of valuable information.  This time was no different. Read on! Share...

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PEANUT AND TREE NUT ALLERGY ALERT

Nov 30

PEANUT AND TREE NUT ALLERGY ALERT Nov. 29, 2010 Quaker Canada is recalling “Quaker Chewy Granola Bars Value Pack” cartons, sold in Canada, due to undeclared peanuts and tree nuts. FAAN is sending notification of this recall because, per the manufacturer, some consumers of this product may be U.S. residents. The affected product is packaged in 14-count cartons with UPC Bar Code 55577 10742. The carton should contain Chewy Chocolate Chip and Chewy S’mores bars, but could incorrectly contain Dipps Chocolate Chip and Dipps Caramel Nut bars. Consumers should return the recalled product to the place of purchase for a refund. Consumers with questions should contact Quaker Canada at (800) 267-6287. Share...

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MARKHAM RESIDENTS CAUTIONED TO INSPECT HALLOWEEN CANDY

Nov 01

TOWN OF MARKHAM RESIDENTS CAUTIONED TO INSPECT HALLOWEEN CANDY http://www.nestle.ca/en/PressRelease/Markham_Favourites.htm Toronto – October 22, 2010 – Nestlé Canada Inc. and Walmart Canada are advising residents of the Town of Markham, Ontario, that four packages of 94 count Nestlé Fav*rites snack size chocolate bars were found to contain candy not manufactured by Nestlé and some candy not sold by Walmart Canada. For example, one box contained Kit Kat bars manufactured and sold in the U.S., by another company. Unlike Nestlé Canada’s Fav*rites that are made in a peanut-free facility, the U.S. Kit Kat bars are manufactured in a facility that also processes peanuts, as indicated on the wrapper. These boxes were discovered at the Copper Creek Walmart in Markham, Ontario. All investigations by the appropriate authorities suggest that this is an isolated incident. There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product. Consumers are asked to check their packaging and ensure it contains only Nestlé branded products as indicated on the wrapper. As always, consumers are encouraged to read the ingredient list before consuming any product and parents are reminded to thoroughly check all Halloween candy. For more information, consumers can contact: Nestlé Consumer Services at 1-800-387-4636 between 9:00 am – 6:00 pm (EST) Monday to Friday. The line will also be open on October 23 and October 24 between 9:00 am – 6:00 pm (EST). Walmart Canada Customer Service at 1-800-328-0402 between 7:30 am – 5:30 pm (EST) Monday to Friday. Share...

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PEANUT ALLERGY ALERT

Oct 25

Oct. 23, 2010 Nestlé USA is recalling “Nestlé® Raisinets® Fun Size Bags” due to undeclared peanuts. The 10-oz bags were sold in Target, Shop Rite, and Don Quixote retail stores in the U.S. The product is marked with production code 02015748 and UPC 2800010255. Consumers should contact the company at (800) 478-5670 for a refund. Share...

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NoTrickTreats.com Helps Children with Restricted Diets Enjoy Halloween

Oct 14

Jon sent us news of a new service website on the web that aims to help kids find safe homes to Trick or Treat at. I’ve checked it out and it’s really well done and easy to follow. All we need now is for EVERYONE to use it! Check out this news release and get your home listed too! I did and I hope it helps. Although many American children list Halloween as their favorite holiday, this is less often the case when – due to a dietary restriction – a child can’t enjoy the same candy as everyone else. But a new website is looking to change that. This fall, for the first time, NoTrickTreats.com will let children and their parents make a custom trick-or-treating map of their area, showing the homes that will be giving out Halloween treats that they can enjoy. Homes and business that will be serving specialty candy can mark themselves on the map, indicating whether their treats will be suitable for vegan, nut-free, diabetic, organic, kosher, gluten-free, or raw diets. “There’s no denying that Halloween is a blast”, says Jon Zornow – the site’s creator, “but it’s a candy-centric holiday, and it leaves a lot of kids feeling excluded.” Zornow, who is vegan, says he was inspired to create the site when he realized that if he had been vegan growing up, he would probably hate Halloween – and that vegan kids weren’t the only ones missing out. The site, NoTrickTreats.com, lets you find your neighborhood and search for homes by food specialty. It’s easy to use and user-friendly for trick-or-treaters of all ages and computer skills. Although it has only been online for a few days, Zornow says has been humbled by the positive response. “I’ve heard from numerous parents and bloggers who are excited to search and share their Halloween information. It feels good to be part of something that is helping the whole community.” Share...

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Another October comes around

Oct 07

Another October comes around

And it’s time to break out the old Halloween post: http://eatnutfree.com/2008/10/a-nut-free-halloween/ I posted that 2 years ago and it still holds true. Given that there are things you can do to allow your child to still enjoy a night out gathering treats, will you be letting the little one visit your neighbours? I know my neighbours, but I also know I have alot of empty-nesters from an age between me and my parents, and some around my parents. Do they know about food allergies enough to not have the container of Reeses Peanutbutter cups at the door? We are still undecided if our’s will be making the rounds. What about you? Share...

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“anaphylaxis to airborne food particles is very rare”: Dr Ham Pong

Oct 07

“anaphylaxis to airborne food particles is very rare”: Dr Ham Pong

For anyone who did not know this, it’s great to hear this from a prominent artillerist. The opening paragraph tells us: You can be assured that anaphylaxis to airborne food particles is very rare. An allergic reaction to food will not occur because someone is eating it in a classroom or vicinity of the allergic person. The main reason for advising that the allergenic food not be brought into a classroom is the potential for an allergic child to accidentally ingest some by sharing food. Secondary reasons (less likely to cause anaphylaxis because of the smaller quantities involved) are cross-contamination of desks, toys etc. He goes on to tell us that the smell of peanuts in the air does not come from the peanut protein.  Note, though, that peanut dust in the air can cause a reaction. Like if a room full of people opened packages of peanuts at the same time. Give the Allergic Living article a read to set your mind at ease, or at least part of your mind 🙂 Share...

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Applebee’s won’t bend

Sep 30

Applebee’s won’t bend

I was contacted today by Paul about a series of posts that have been gathering attention on his blog at Allergy Eats. This is not so much an attack at Applebee’s but hopefully someting that will bring attention to what the food-allergic community can potentially bring to a food chain. Applebee’s is a good starting point, being the largest casual food chain in America, and the largest food chain in America that does not cater to the food allergic. What? How can someone so engrained in the U.S. be so standoffish? Apparently they don’t seem to care enough to provide Paul with a suitable answer. Not enough to give him a few minutes of time with an Operations Officer to discuss what they are missing out on. Were no’t just talking about the charming people who will not eat there now, were talking about the MILLIONS of dollars per year that they could be filling thier coffers with. REad on to hear what Paul has to say, then send an email to the Applebee’s office and tell them to get off thier duff and do something about it. Again, this should not just apply to Applebee’s. Insert the name of any restaurant, chain or not, that is not noticing the growing throngs of people who might like to eat there if only your staff were aware of how to manage our plates. It’s not really that difficult, it just takes awareness. Al little piece of what Paul has to say: The saga started on August 17 when we posted an AllergyEats Blog entry entitled “Guest post – Applebee’s disappoints!,” which detailed the story of one disappointing customer experience.  This opened up a flood of comments on our blog and Facebook page.  The posts showed that a tremendous number of food-allergic diners have had negative experiences at Applebee’s.  Given this response, and seeing that they had a poor AllergyEats allergy-friendliness rating (2.3 on a scale of 1 to 5), I decided to call and allow them to address the issue. READ ON, it’s a really good read. Share...

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Keeps Me Safe keeps me safe with hand made bracelets

Sep 27

Keeps Me Safe keeps me safe with hand made bracelets

I love my new hand-made Medical Alert bracelet from Keeps Me Safe. Delivery from Spain to Ottawa, Canada was very fast at about 2 weeks. In the package I received the bracelet, the tag and some spare rings in case I needed to extend the size, which I did not. When I ordered I sent them the exact size of my wrist and when they manufacture the bracelet I assume they give you a bit of extra room so it does not fit too snug.. The bracelet I chose was the dark brown leather weave with silver coloured accents. It is very nicely woven with thick leather strips and a Celtic-inspired bead at its center. The tag is a solid metal, I assume steel, with an embossed universal blue medical symbol on the outer side. The under-side is embossed with the info I submitted and it fills the whole underside with the shorter of the 2 lines using a larger font. This is good as it makes it easy to read. The only suggestion I have for Keeps Me Safe is to either use a wider font (bold for example) or a deeper embossing. The reason is the font has such a thin line that unless angled just right it is hard to read. When speed is of utmost importance in an emergency you don’t want to be fumbling trying to read the test on a tag. With the selection of bracelets available I think the Keeps Me Safe collection will suit any event or occasion from formal to casual. The tags come off and are interchangeable so you can have one tag and many bracelets to suit wherever you go and whatever you wear. Women’s Children’s Men’s It is an attractive option to keep you or your family members safe. Share...

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CBC article commenter says what most of us have only thought

Aug 25

John Murray is a man of MANY words. These are the words that I have always wanted to say, but found I could not do so and keep my composure. John does it very well in response to the comments after the CBC artical “CBC News – What teachers and parents should know about severe food allergies” I posted about earlier. Found here http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2010/08/19/f-vp-smith.html John says: “Isn’t the whole point being missed by some of these reader comments. The article is about children of severe allergies in school. It isn’t about sensitivities or, or even celiac which doesn’t compare to anaphylaxis. I won’t comment on the unrelated comments, as they are nonsense in the discussion of this article. The point is that severe allergies are often fatal — that means death. Death can be very sudden with anaphylaxis, hence the importance of the epi-pen. Death can occur in minutes without this lifesaving device. If anyone at all thinks severe allergies are an inconvenience , you need to re-evaluate your moral compass. Death. That is the point, and by diminishing or dismissing the severity of it is irresponsible and selfish. Anyone who thinks that a child should potentially die a sudden death in a roomful of children is an absolute sicko. That is the real truth of it. As I said, the article is about children. Adults deal with severe allergies everyday — on their own. Some adults don’t even develop allergies until much later in life, at 35 or any age. A severe peanut allergy can develop ‘just like that.’ I know this through my own experience, and I have never demanded special consideration. However, if you knowingly send your child to school with nut products in a ban, you are not only just sick, but also criminal if a child dies.” “Rights or personal responsibility has no part in this discussion. To state that a young child should take responsibility for their own actions or suffer death is ridiculous and callous. And restricting the type of food taken to school is not an infringement of rights. Denying a child an education by discrimination is a violation of human rights. There is nothing here that ‘controls’ your life. You and your family...

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CBC News – What teachers and parents should know about severe food allergies

Aug 23

CBC News – What teachers and parents should know about severe food allergies

What teachers and parents should know about severe food allergies This article by Gwen Smith of Allergic Living Magazine gives an important message for everyone with children in the school. Whether you are a parent of an allergic child, a parent with a child attending the school with allergic children, or a teacher at that school, you need to read this article. It goes through many important points to consider for snacks and lunches. Outlines a few facts and dangers associated with food allergies and how we can all get along together if the allergic and non-allergic make a few adjustments. This is a Canadian site, but these apply to wherever you are. via CBC News – Canada – What teachers and parents should know about severe food allergies. Share...

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A Nut Allergy Skeptic Learns the Hard Way – TIME

Aug 20

A Nut Allergy Skeptic Learns the Hard Way – TIME

Illustration by John Ueland for TIME Joel Stein has a knack for writing articles that raises the hair on the back of people’s necks.  (See his article “Have Americans Gone Nuts Over Nut Allergies?” This time he gets his own, though not in a way I would wish on ANYONE. A Nut Allergy Skeptic Learns the Hard Way By JOEL STEIN Saturday, Aug. 14, 2010 Years ago, sitting on an ear doctor’s examining table after causing my inner ear to bleed for days by puncturing it with a Q-tip, I looked up to see a framed copy of a column about how stupid it is to put Q-tips in your ears. It was a column I had written. When you publish hundreds of obnoxiously self-righteous proclamations, some of them are going to cause you embarrassment. Which doesn’t seem all that big of a deal when you also have blood leaking from your ears. At the beginning of last year, I wrote a column that questioned whether the increase in food allergies among children was a matter of overreporting. It began with this carefully calibrated thought: “Your kid doesn’t have an allergy to nuts. Your kid has a parent who needs to feel special.” After that, I got a little harsh. (See nine kid foods to avoid.) The column was not the first thing that came to mind after my 1-year-old son Laszlo started sneezing, then breaking out in hives, then rubbing his eyes, then crying through welded-shut eyes, then screaming and, finally, vomiting copiously at the entrance of the Childrens Hospital emergency room an hour after eating his first batch of blended mixed nuts. via A Nut Allergy Skeptic Learns the Hard Way – TIME. Share...

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New Delicardo Foodcards Contest!

Aug 06

The folks at Delicardo Foodcards just alerted me to a new contest they are running where you can win 50 Delicardo Foodcards of your choice! Here are some details. The rest can be found on their Facebook page. DELICARDO Foodcards, a very helpful little card that contains your dietary dos and don’ts, is having a scavenger hunt. To go into the draw to win a pack of 50 DELICARDO Foodcards of your choosing (go tohttp://www.delicardo.com to see the range of cards available) answer the questions below: 1. What rating did Rosanne give “The Bell Jar” café at http://www.glutensavvy.com? 2. What is the secret word in the magnifying glass on the “Disney with Food Allergies” travel page at http://www.avoidingmilkprotein.com? (Tip: You can find the pages here http://www.avoidingmilkprotein.com/travel.htm) 3. Who is the founder of www.mallergies.com and what is your favourite post there? (Tip: You can choose any post found at the website) 4. What is the name of the trail mix recently reviewed athttp://www.foodallergyqueen.com? 5. Which allergies and intolerances are mentioned in the founding story of DELICARDO? (Tip: Check the story page at http://www.delicardo.com) Send your answers and your choice of cards to Delicardo Foodie via facebook (http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000358462929) or email bosson@enomis.dewith the subject line “facebook competition”. Competition ends 24 August 2010. For more details go to the “Eating Out: Allergies and Diets” facebook group pagehttp://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=340959892390. Remember all entries must be sent to Delicardo. Have fun! Share...

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Allergies Attack iPhone Game

Aug 05

Allergies Attack iPhone Game

Allergies Attack is a fun game developed by an allergic-aware developer who put together this game to help promote awareness of allergies and at the same time, help people have fun while getting through the day. The game follows a boy during his dreams in which he goes on the offensive against all types of allergies; pollen, bees, peanuts, dust, pet dander, you name it. Fly a ship and shoot the baddies out of the sky as they come flying towards you. I bought the game and found it to be fun and managed to get through a few levels of play. I’ve been told that there will be an update to introduce a more child-friendly settings so that even the little ones can enjoy it to its fullest! At only .99 cents you too can support the awareness campaign! (links to Itunes.com) Enjoy! Share...

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Sunbutter Video Contest

Aug 05

Sunbutter has contacted us to let us know of a new contest they are holding! http://bit.ly/videodetails will take you to their Facebook page. Sadly it does not seem to be open to Canadians. So are you going to enter?     Here’s a lowdown on what they want and what you get: Grand Prize Chosen by SunButter: A case (6 jars) of SunButter $100 US savings bond 2nd Prize Chosen by voters: A jar (16 oz) of SunButter $100 US savings bond 3rd Prize Chosen by voters: A jar (16 oz) of SunButter $100 US savings bond Prize Eligibility Only persons residing in United States who are at least 18 years of age can enter. Contest Starts August 01, 2010 @ 12:01 am (CDT) Contest Ends September 03, 2010 @ 11:59 pm (CDT) Share...

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